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Are you worried about your Breast Calcifications?

What causes Breast Calcifications?

Macrocalcifications are large white dots on a mammogram and almost always require no further medical assessment. Microcalcifications, which appear as finer white specks, are also usually benign but in some instances will require further testing to check for signs of cancer.

What can you do at home?

Macrocalcifications are large white dots on a mammogram and almost always require no further medical assessment. Microcalcifications, which appear as finer white specks, are also usually benign but in some instances will require further testing to check for signs of cancer.

Breast Calcifications
You should also seek further medical attention if you experience any of the following:

Breast calcifications are found during a mammogram, where a medical professional will already be present. Your radiologist may refer you to a specialist or recommend coming back for follow-up examinations to help determine the severity of the issue.

Are you worried about your Breast Calcifications?

Here at VIDA we have expert clinicians on hand to help diagnose and treat your condition. To find out more about these services, we recommend visiting the following pages:

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0333 300 2979

Possible Causes and Related Conditions
  • Breast cancer
  • Breast cysts
  • Cell secretions or debris
  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)
  • Fibroadenoma
  • Mammary duct ectasia
  • Previous injury or surgery to the breast (fat necrosis)
  • Previous radiation therapy for cancer
  • Skin (dermal) or blood vessel (vascular) calcification
Frequently Asked Questions
Are breast calcifications common?

Breast calcifications are very common and oftentimes are harmless. They usually look like small dots are don’t cause pain. As we age our body’s change and therefore breast calcifications can occur. Although they are fairly common, they can sometimes be an early sign of cancer which is why it is important, if you are concerned, to speak to a doctor who can determine whether they are benign or need further testing.